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Wampus Society
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CONTACT: y o u r f r i e n d @ l u m b e r w o o d s . o r g
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FEARSOME CRITTERS
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    At the turn of the twentieth century, hundreds of local rumors of natural absurdities sprang into existence. These imaginings were neither legendary in their proportions like Norse or Greek epics, nor, at any time, were they ever intended to inspire any sincere or moral convictions. Rather such stories existed mostly in the practical jokes and tall tales popular among people of a particular trade. Despite their facetious tone, they bear the distinct markings of a rich tradition. Yet legends they are not. In fact, such stories appear in many ways to be an antithesis to traditional legends. Taken together we have placed this class of tales under banner of natura ad absurdum (nature to absurdity), as the tradition may encompass fantastical aspects of any variety (plants, weather, minerals, objects, etc.) in addition to imaginary beings. However, these stories are chiefly remembered for their play on the animal kingdom. It is these extraordinary animals what are known in North America as “fearsome critters.”
    Fearsome critters flourished at the turn of the twentieth century within logging camps near North America’s Great Lakes region. However, at the time, immigrant presence in the region had practically established the industry as an international affair. Folklorist Charles E. Brown recounted loggers who remarked that logging camps comprise of a, “babel of tongues.”1 Similarly, Luke Sylvester “Lake Shore” Kearney in his book, The Hodag and Other Tales of the Logging Camps, upholds this characterization by stating that of the Scandinavian, Irish and French loggers, “Each, in his turn, goaded and cursed in his native tongue, using the blasphemy characteristic of his nationality.”2 An 1880s census taken in Wisconsin showed that foreign born loggers comprised over half of the entire industry, the greater majority being Canadian.3
    Logging camps were separated from mainstream society for months at a time. There, loggers of multiple nationalities would entertain each other through story, song or joke. Likewise, woodsmen would often invent colorful ways to induct new arrivals to camp. A common initiation right for inexperienced loggers was the “snipe hunt” (sometimes “snow snake hunt”). This task involved novice woodsmen, referred to as “greenhorns,” being led deep into the woods at dusk. Subsequently, each participant is given a bag and directed to go out, with their primitive tools, to catch the elusive animal. The joke is that the snipe, which bears no relation to the wading bird, is a purely fictitious enitty; only ever existing in the imaginations of those pursuing it. Afterwards, those participants, who were victims of the gag, would inevitably induct later recruits in the ritual and so on and so forth.
    Fearsome critters enjoyed much popularity in tall tales told aloud in logging camp bunkhouses. After a hard day’s work, loggers would spin tales to regale their fellow woodsmen. Perhaps unbeknownst to their original creators, these anecdotes would be retold over and over again eventually coming to form a rich folkloric tradition. This same tradition also came to incorporate the modern perspective and knowledge of the storytellers. To illustrate, the hodag of North American traditions is described as having, “stegosaurian dorsal spines,”4 while the salvager sucker, of the Puget Sound vicinity, is reported to be able to do the work of “a steam derrick.”5 Just the same, the snow wasset, of the Canadian boreal zone, is reported to “hibernate” during the warmer seasons.6 Each one of these comparisons is sometjing that the originators of classic mythology would have not have had the knowledge to draw.
    Perhaps it is their ever curious nature or a varied sense of bafflement that continues to endure fearsome critters to many today. While most fearsome critters probably disappeared from existence as abruptly as they came to be, a good number of such traditions not only survived but continued to make lasting impressions. Several fearsome critters have even become celebrated symbols of regional or local pride. The hodag has become synonymous with the city of Rhinelander, adorning numerous business and clubs, as well the jackalope has grown into a recognizable icon of Douglas, Wyoming. Moreover, fearsome critters, themselves, help foster a sense of wonderment into the mundane everyday; a sprinkling of fantasy, if you will, into an otherwise demystified world. As well, fearsome critters were the product of a fanciful and bold exercise of imagination. Consequently, each fearsome critter possesses a uniqueness that make them truly stand out as local icons in a way that many classic legends simply cannot. However, perhaps the most powerful aspect, fearsome critters hold over traditional legends, is that fearsome critters, collectively, appeal as essentially, “mythological underdogs,” and, in truth, even if one cheers on the popular team—one cannot help but root for the underdog.
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1 Michael Edmonds, Out of the Northwoods: The Many Lives of Paul Bunyan (Madison: Wisconsin Historical Society Press, 2009), 163.
2 Lake Shore Kearney, The Hodag and Other Tales of the Logging Camps (Wausau: Democrat Printing Company, 1928), 10.
3 Edmonds, 34-35.
4 Henry H. Tryon, Fearsome Critters (Cornwall, NY: Idlewild Press, 1939), 23.
5 The Seattle Star, “Speaking of Fish, Old Reader of Star Writes of Salvager Sucker, Which Does the Work of Steam Derrick.” April 08, 1913. 3. From Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers, Library of Congress. http://tinyurl.com/m39m8lp
6 William T. Cox, Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods (Washington: Press of Judd & Detweiler, Inc., 1910), 39.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY
  1. Cox, William T. with Latin Classifications by George B. Sudworth. Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods.
    (Washington, D.C.: Judd & Detweiler Inc., 1910.)
  2. Tryon, Henry Harrington. Fearsome Critters. (Cornwall, NY: Idlewild Press, 1939)
  3. Randolph, Vance. We Always Lie to Strangers: Tall Tales from the Ozarks. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1951.)
  4. Wyman, Walker D. Mythical Creatures of the North Country. (River Falls, WI: River Falls State University Press, 1969.) *
  5. Brown, C.E. The Wild Animals of Paul Bunyan's Northwoods. (Madison: self-published, 1935.)
  6. Borges, Jorge Luis. Book of Imaginary Beings. (New York: Viking Press, 2005.)
  7. Cassidy, Frederic G. and Hall, Joan H. Dictionary of American regional English. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2002)
  8. Cohen, Daniel. Monsters, Giants, and Little Men from Mars: An Unnatural History of the Americas. (New York: Doubleday, 1975)
  9. Wyman, Walker D. Mythical Creatures of the USA and Canada. (River Falls, WI: Univ of Wisconsin Riverfalls Press,1978.)
  10. Wilson, Harry L. Ma Pettengill. (Garden City, NY: Double Day, Page & Company 1919.)
  11. Robinson, William H. Yarns Of The Southwest. (Phoenix, AZ.: The Berryhill Company, 1921.)
  12. Stevens, James. The Saginaw Paul Bunyan. (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., 1932.)
  13. Skinner, Charles. “Maine’s Woodland Terrors,” American Myths & Legends. (Philadelphia & London: J.B. Lippincott Co, 1903.)
  14. Thompson, Harold W. O'Donnell, Thomas F. Body, Boots, & Britches: Folktales, Ballads, And Speech From Country.
    (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1939.)
  15. Robert, Paul and Trank, Beath Lynn. Febold Feboldson. (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1948.)
  16. Prelutsky, Jack. Imagine That! Poems Of Never-Was. (New York: Random House, 1998.)
  17. Cobb, Irvin S. Sundry Accounts. Chapt. VIII, “Alas, The Poor Whiffletit.” (New York: George H. Doran Company, 1922.)
  18. Schwartz, Alvin. Kickle Snifters and Other Fearsome Critters. (Binghamton, NY: Harpercollins Juvenile Books, 1978.)
  19. Rubin, C.E. & Williams, M. Larger Than Life: The American Tall-Tale Postcard, 1905-1915. (New York: Abbeville Press, 1990.)
  20. Leach, Maria. Funk & Wagnalls Standard Dictionary Of Folklore, Mythology and Legend. (New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1949.)
  21. Boyton, Patrick. Snallygaster: the Lost Legend of Frederick County. (Maryland: Self-Published, 2008.)
  22. Andersen, Alan L. The Frost Haint of ‘Possum Hollow’ and Other Ozark Tales. (Self-published, 2008.)
  23. Dorson, Richard M. Man and Beast in American Comic Legend. (Bloomington, IN: Indiana Univ. Press, 1982.)
  24. Life (1951, January 29). “Audubon Continued, His Phony Fish.” Life, Vol. 30, No. 5, pp. 51.
  25. Life; Lewicki, J. (1960, Aug 22). “Folklore of America, Ballads and tales of the Frontier.” Life, Vol.49 , No. 8, pp. 48-63.
  26. Ives, Ronald L. (1938, April 2). “You Don't Have To Believe It.” Science News Letter, Vol. 33, No. 14, pp. 214-215+222.
  27. Rafinesque, C. S. Ichthyologia ohiensis, or Natural history of the fishes inhabiting the river Ohio and its tributary streams,
    preceded by a physical description of the Ohio and its branches.
    (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1820.)
  28. Childs, Art. Yarns of the Big Woods.
    (Chicago: Associated Editors, 1922 and 1925)
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WEBOGRAPHY
  1. Carden, Gary. (2003). Wondrous and Fearsome Creatures of the Southern Wild. Retrieved April 10, 2009, from Appalachian Rant.
    Web site:Folklore Subjects. Retrieved April 09, 2009, from The Read on WNC.
  2. The Gollywampus.(1996). Gallywhat? Retrieved April 07, 2009, from Gallywampus, Irish and American Folk Music
  3. Andersen, Alan Lance. (2005). CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS, Wizard Academies. Retrieved April 09, 2009, from Wizard Academies.
  4. Various. (2004). Odd and Curious Beasties. Retrieved April 09, 2009, from WORDCRAFT Forums.
  5. Mott, D. (n.d.). Unusual Animals. Retrieved April 07, 2009, from ussscouts.org.
  6. Wooldridge, John. (2007). Monsters of the Ozarks and Missouri - Information Wanted. Retrieved April 09, 2009, from Nick Redfern's "There's Something in the Woods...".
  7. Carlson, Marc. (1997). American Fabulous. Retrieved October 08, 2009, from Marc Carlson's Homepage, Gaming Materials.
  8. Roadsideamerica.com Team. (2005). Monico, Wisconsin - Rhinelapus: Tree Root Monster Rival to The Hodag. Retrieved November 15, 2009, from RoadSideAmerica.com.
  9. Various. (2008). Swamp Booger. Retrieved November 15, 2009, from Taxidermy.Net Forum.
  10. Zapato, Lyle. (1998). About The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus. Retrieved November 29, 2009, from Help Save The Endangered Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus from Extinction.
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MAINTAINED AND MANAGED BY THE
Wampus Society
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DATABASE
[ Click on a Name for Further Detail. ] X
KEY: Bestiae (Beasts) ♢ Minuta animala (Small animals) ♢ Aves (Birds)
Serpentes (Reptiles) ♢ Pisces (Fishes) ♢  N.O.  Name Only ♢ + Felids
1, 2, 3, etc. Reference No. ♢ "( )" Latin Nomenclature ♢ "[ ]" Also Known As
Wymn. Prof. Walker D. Wyman, Tryn. Henry H. Tryon, Sudw. George B. Sudworth,
Rafin. Constantine Samuel Rafinesque (With origins in a practical joke by John James Audubon)
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  1. Treesqueak (Arborexusta stridens; Tryn.)2, 18
  2. Jimplecute [Jimplicute] (Verbumfalsus incomprehensibilis)3, b
  3. Fish Hound 3
  4. Teakettler 5, 6, 9
  5. Squidgicum-Squee 18
  6. Belled Buzzard 3, a
  7. Hoopsnake [Hornsnake] (Serpenscirculousus caudavenenifer; Tryn.)2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 18, 23
  8. Billdad (Saltipiscator falcorostratus; Sudw.)1, 9, 18
  9. Santer (Nadiocties palustris; Tryn.)2
  10. Wapaloosie (Geometrigradus cilioretractus; Sudw.)1, 9
  11. Cross-Eyed Crud 3
  12. Giddy Fish (Parvipiseis; Wymn.)5, 8
  13. Bedcat (Cimecofelis ferrignus; Wymn.)4, 9
  14. Guyuscutus [Guiaskuitus, Guyanosa] [Sky Floogle (Avis horribilus spurious; Wymn.)] 23
  15. Rubberado (Erethizon neoprenicum; Wymn.)8, 18, 26
  16. Whirling Whimpus (Turbinoccissus nebuloides; Sudw.)1, 2, 8, 9, b
  17. Rumptifusel [Rumtifusel] (Villosus sumptuosus; Tryn.) 2, 5, 8, 9
  18.  N.O.  Darby-Hick 3
  19.      Whing-Whang 18
  20. Happy Auger 15
  21. Whangdoodle 3
  22. Upland Trout (Salmo culiphilis volans; Wymn.) 5, 6, 9
  23. Wunk 18
  24. Gumberoo (Megalogaster repercussus; Sudw.) 1, 2, 5, 8, 9
  25. Squonk (Lacrimacorpus dissolvens; Sudw.) 1, 2, 6, 9, 18
  26. Picoderm 3
  27.      Dismal Sauger 12
  28. Joint Snake [Glass Snake] (Serpentes fragmenticus; Wymn.) 3, 9, 11, 18
  29. Snallygaster [Bovapulous, Go-Devil] 21
  30. Rhinelapus i
  31. Tripodero (Collapsofemuris geocatapeltes; Sudw.) 1, 2, 5, 8, 18, 26
  32. Mileormore [Clew-Bird] 3
  33. Hinge-Tailed Bingbuffer [Glyptodon] (Glyptodontis petrobolus; Wymn.) 3, 18
  34.      Whistling Whoo-Hoo 3
  35. Pinnacle Grouse (Avis gyrovolitatus; Wymn.) 5, 6, 9
  36. Bald-Knob Buzzard 3, a
  37. Moskitto [Beeskeeter, Bumbelito, Arkansas Snipe] (Insecta gigantious; Wymn.) 5, 9, a
  38.      Windyo 18
  39. Whimpering Whingding 15
  40. Whiffenpoof [Hoopajuba, Whiffle-poofle, Gilli-Galoo Fish] (Piscisabsurdus tumescens; Tryn.) 2, 18
  41. Augerino [Augurine] (Serpentes Spirillum; Wymn.) 7, 9, f
  42. Razorback 3
  43. Fur-Bearing Trout [Furred Salmon] (Salmo hirsutis tonsorius; Wymn.) 4, 8, 9, 19, 26
  44. Cougar Fish (Pterygium unguis acutis; Wymn.) 5
  45. Central American Whintosser (Cephalovertens semperambulatus; Sudw.) 1, 9
  46.  N.O.    Yowho Bird 3
  47. Camp Chipmonk [Vilas County Tiger] 4, 5, 9
  48.  N.O.  Vociferous Antissmus 14
  49.  N.O.  Barking Moon Crumbler 14
  50. Wampus Cat [Gallywampus, Orance] * 2, 4, 9, c
  51. Snow Wasset (Mustelinopsis subitivorax; Sudw.) 1, 9
  52. Hicklesnoopus + 3
  53. Painter + 3, b
  54. Opossum Snake
  55. Silvercat + (Felis glabraspiculata; Tryn.) 2, 5, 8
  56.  N.O.    Kankagee 20
  57. Ice Worms (Vermes frigidus; Wymn.) 8, 9
  58. Hangdown 5, 9
  59.  N.O.  Ding-Toed Awk 15
  60.      Whooper Hopper 19
  61. Dingmaul + [Plunkus, Ding-Ball] (Saxicatellus vociferens; Tryn.) 2, 13
  62. Blue Ox (Taurus azureus) 12
  63. Swamp Booger j
  64. Luferlang (Spinacaerulea tresarticulosus; Tryn.) 2, 4, 5, 9, 18
  65. Gillygaloo [Galoopus] 4, 3, 5, 8, 9
  66. Argopelter [Agropelter] (Anthrocephalus craniofractens; Sudw.) 1, 2, 4, 8, 9, a
  67. Roperite (Rhynchoropus flagelliformis; Sudw.) 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, 9
  68. Boger Owls 2, 3
  69. Whirligig Fish (Piscis gyrinicus porcinus; Wymn.) 5, 9
  70.  N.O.  Linkumsluice 2
  71.  N.O.  Geek-Squaw 3
  72. Snawfus (Cervoalborum floraplenus) 3, 18
  73. Hidebehind [Nighbehind, High-Behind] (Ursus dissimulans; Tryn.) 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 18
  74. Flittericks 5, 8, 9
  75. Bogie-Bird 3
  76. Wowzer + 3
  77. Timberdoodle 2, 18
  78. Come-at-a-body (Quadrupes inprovisus; Tryn.) 2, 18
  79. Hodag (Bovine spiritualis; Shepard, E. S.) * 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 23
  80. Log Gar (Lepisosteus longicornus multidentata; Wymn.) 5
  81. Goofang [Goofgang] (Xerophthalmus opistobaenos; Wymn.) 6, 5, 8
  82. Will-Am-Alone 13
  83. Ring-Tailed Tooter 3
  84. Milamo (Avis vermivora; Wymn.) 9, 18
  85.  N.O.    Toodalong Buzzard 3
  86.  N.O.    Jayhawk 20
  87. Glawackus 8
  88. Waterloo Plover 3, a
  89. Waterloo Bonney 3, a
  90.      Whopperknocker 2
  91. Leprocaun (Simiidiabolus hibernicus horribilis; Sudw.) 1
  92. Snipe (Scolopax inexplicabilis; Tryn.) 2
  93. Swamp Auger (Fish) (Natator Palustris var. perforens; Tryn.) 3, 14
  94. Giasticutus 3
  95. Taneycomo Turtle 3
  96. Snow Snake [Shovel-Tailed Snow Snake] (Aestatesommus hiemepericulosus; Tyrn.) 2, 5, 9
  97. Snoligoster (Dorsohastatus caudirotula; Sudw.) 1, 9
  98. Phillyloo [Philamaloo, Gillygoo] 3, 5, 8, 16, 20
  99. Ball-Tailed Cat + (Felis candaglobosa; Tryn.) 2
  100. Gowrow (Verdisquamata cruribrevis; Wymn.) 3, 9, 18
  101. Goofus [Filla-Ma-Loo, Flu-fly, Whiffle, Guffel] (Fulica stultusregrediens; Tryn.) 2, 4, 5, 3, 8, 9, 18
  102. Dungavenhooter (Crocodilus hauriens; Tryn.) 2
  103. Bassigator  
  104. Splintercat (Felynx arbordiffisus.; Sudw.) 1, 2, 4, 9, 18
  105.  N.O.  Lopsided Awger  
  106. Celofay 2
  107. Sidehill Gouger (Membriinequales declivitatis; Tryn.) * 2, 5, 8, 18, 23
  108. Funeral Mountain Terrashot (Funericorpus displosissimum; Sudw.) 1, 9
  109. Tote-Road Shagamaw (Bipedester delusissimus; Sudw.) 1, 2, 5, 9
  110.  N.O.  Mugwump Bird 20
  111. Keyhole Crab (Pinchus Virginianus)
  112. Cactus Cat + (Cactifelinus inebrius; Sudw.) 1, 2, 3, 8, 9
  113. Hyampom Hog Bear (Ursus unimorsus amantiporcus; Sudw.) 1, 9
  114.      Kickle Snifters [Hickle Snifters] 18, 20
  115. Cabbit b
  116. Ponjureen 3
  117. Hugag (Rythmopes inarticulatus; Sudw.) 1, 2, 9, 18, 23
  118. Chawgreen 3
  119. Cross-Feathered Snee 2
  120. Slide-Rock Bolter (Macrostoma saxiperrumptus; Sudw.) 1, 9, 18
  121. Bear-Behind 3
  122. Axehandle Hound (Canis Consumens; Tryn.) 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, a
  123. Columbia River Sand Squink (Anguillamvorax coruscens; Tryn.) 2
  124. Jackalope [Gooklookus] (Pedigres Leapusalopus) 4, 9, 23
  125. Tailypo  
  126. Old Spider Legs, the Eight Legged Horse (Pseudohippus arachupus; Wymn.) 4, 9
  127. Gee-Gee Bird (Avis cryostatious; Wymn.) 4, 9
  128. Green-Footed Windpiper (Verdipus folliicutus; Wymn.) 4, 9
  129. Kingdoodle 3
  130. Luebker Eagle [Wild Blue Yonder Wonder] (Volitodactyla ionosphericum; Wymn.) 4
  131. Hoot-Peckers (Bube erythorcephalu; Wymn.) 4, 9
  132. Dingbat (Bunkeri edithil; Wymn.) 4, 9
  133. Milking Trout 4
  134. Owl-eyed Ripple Skipper (Extraneuspiscis rindlisbacheri)4
  135. Purple Peopleater
  136. Engineer-Rat [Tonnage-Rat] 4, 9
  137. Three-Tailed Bavalorous (Theriornis tricauda unicornus; Wymn.) 4, 9
  138. Noon Bird 2
  139.       Old Walleyes  
  140. Jersey Devil - folkloric (Teratos incomprehensibilis; Wymn.) 8, 26
  141. Sneeze-Duck [Mu] 10, 11
  142. Filo 10
  143. Hillside Ghyser
  144. Gilaopolis 11
  145. Hellidid 11
  146. Whiffletit 17, 11
  147. Flannel-Throated Golosh [Arctic Bird of the Polar Seas] 17
  148. Milking Snake (Ophidia galactophilla; Wymn.)3, 9
  149.  N.O.  Left-Footed Beechaser 11
  150. Kissing Bug (Insecta osculatus amoratus; Wymn.) 9
  151.  N.O.  Giant Goober-Bug 11
  152. Bull-Bat 17
  153. Pamoola [Pomola] + 13
  154. Bog Hop (Castoralces platycerous; Wymn.) 9
  155.  N.O.  Waw-Waw Bird 3
  156. Hairy Timber Rattlers 3
  157. Stone-Eating Gyascutus 4, 5, 9
  158.  N.O.  Sulfur-Crested Parabola 17
  159.  N.O.  Mountain Rabbit 20
  160. Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus (Octopus paxarbolis; Zapato, L.) k
  161.  N.O.  Moogie 3
  162. Horse-Hair Snake 9
  163. Devil-Jack Diamond Fish (Litholepis adamantimus; Rafin.) 24, 9
  164. Cement Worms [Rock Worms] 9
  165. Beast of ’Busco [Oscar] 23
  166. Turkey Snake (Serpentes horribilus; Wymn.) 9
  167.  N.O.  Koohopper 11
  168. Whickle (Insecta oliohaustorium; Wymn.) 9
  169. Who's Who Bug (Insecta quia-quia; Wymn.) 9
  170. Hairy-Legged Stuka Parrot (Psittacida crusihirsutus; Wymn.) 9
  171. Rattlerrabbit (Lepus casteneta; Wymn.) 9, 26
  172. Ratchet Owl (Bubo cephalovolutum; Wymn.) 9
  173. Big-Tailed Lynx + (Lynx magnacerous canadensis; Wymn.) 9
  174. Cowaskie (Opistodromus; Wymn.) 9
  175. Whiffle-Whiffle (Geocococcyx pygalgicum; Wymn.) 9
  176. Man-Eater (Philanthropus sarcophagii; Wymn.) 9
  177. Pricuricu (Ornis cynophilus; Wymn.) 9
  178. Flambeau Ambler (Piscis carniversa; Wymn.)9
  179. Sandhill Perch (Perca areniculus; Wymn.)9, 26
  180. Fisher River Pond Borer (Limnocetes evelorhyneus; Wymn.) 9
  181. Gyanther (Monocerate archihippus; Wymn.) 9
  182. Water Gouger (Lepisostens unicornus; Wymn.) 9
  183. Pickaliker (Axeansa xylotherepticus; Wymn.) 9
  184. Black-Dotted Perch (perca nigropunctata; Rafin.) 24
  185. Wamfahoopus (Limmertakus boottii; Boott, F.)
  186. Flatnose Double-Fin 24
  187. Big Mouth Sturgeon 24
  188. Toad Mudcat [Mudfish, Mudsucker, Toadfish] 24
  189. Buffalo Carp Sucker 24
  190. White-Eyed Barbot 24
  191. Hydrophobia Skunk 26
  192.       Flycatcher Plant 26
  193. Shoo Fly 25
  194. Petrified Bird 23, 25
  195. Swan Valley Monster 25
  196.  N.O.  Wympsis 2
  197. Ararie 9
  198. Ice Otter (Lutra Atlanticus lachrymosa; Wymn.) 9
  199. Tajar (Amnesias lethalis; Wymn.) 9
  200. Bigfoot - folkloric 9
  201. Wouser (Ursus ferositas delusissimus; Wymn.) 9
  202. Bastard Cat 2
  203. Gushington Slimeback
  204. Salvager Sucker
  205. Opium-Pipe Fish
  206. Cable Cleaning Cropple
  207. Motor-Cop Carp
  208. Speedsimp Sucker
  209. Rust-Eating Perch
  210. Keyhole Crab (Pinchus Virginianus)
  211. Hydra Headed Amphibian Grampet
  212. Wabbergoo
  213. Bat Bass
  214. Ball Fish
  215. Oomph (Ranaincumbramentum alvinschwartzi)28
  216. Duck-Footed Dum-Dum (Ventertympanum coxi)28
  217. Fish-Fox (Picisvulpes coertduboisia) 28
  218. Fog-Hog (Purcusnebulus vancerandolphi)28
  219. Boat Hound (Navisfur wymani) 28
  220. Speedemon (Rapidusdemonicus dorsonae) 28
  221. Gazunk [Flute Bill] (Tibiarostrum tryoni) 28
  222. Squasholiger (Incessuscucumis eugeneshepardi)28
  223. Skeeteroo (Ferrumproboscis artchildsi)28
  224. Wamp (Caudasal lakeshorekearni)28
  225. Accordianteater (Musicacorupus botkini)28
  226.       Swingdingle (Terrorarboreus danielcoheni)28
  227. Mug-Lump (Fustiscauda borgesia)28
  228. Bait Robber (Vermisvulpes vancerandolphi)28
  229. Griddlegreaser Pete (Arvinaporcus lakeshorekearni)28
  230. Trapspringer (Inconcinnuscasus wymani)28
  231. Sizzerbill (Fortexrostrum coxi)28
  232. Callopode (Musicacorpus tryoni)28
  233. Spurdoodle (Caputacutus charlesbrownella) 28
  234. Mapolians 28
  235.       Will-o’-the-Wisp 28
  236. Anserbak (Avisimago artchildsi)28
  237. Gloflikop (Luxvolatilis lomaxi)28
  238. Treehopper (Humulusarboreus charlesbrownella)28
  239. Shovel-Face Oscar (Caputpala borgesia) 28
  240. Red-Eye Aplocentrus (Aplocentre) 24
  241. Black Buffalo-Fish (Catostomus niger) 24
  242. Rough-Head Sucker (Catostomus fasciolaris) 24
  243. Big-Mouth Sucker (Castomus? megastomus) 24
  244.       Penobscot Ice Breaker
  245.       Wild Auger Handle
  246. Blue Racer
  247. Yellow Racer
  248. Fobbit
  249. Sea Bat
  250. Gremlin
  251. Big-Eye Jumping Mouse (Gerbillus megalops; Rafin.)
  252. Lion-Tail Jumping Mouse (Gerbillus leonurus; Rafin.)
  253. Three-Striped Mole Rat (Spalax trivittata; Rafin.)
  254. Brindled Stamiter (Cricetus fasciatus; Rafin.)
  255. Black-Eared Shrew [Corn Mouse] (Sorex melanotis; Rafin.)
  256. Bluish Shrew Mouse (Sorex cerulescens; Rafin.)
  257. White Feet Mouse (Musculus leucopus; Rafin.)
  258. Blackish Rat (Musculus nigricans; Rafin.)
  259. Mole Lemming (Lemmus talpoides; Rafin.)
  260. White-Stripped Lemming (Lemmus albovittatus; Rafin.)
  261. Great Fox Squirrel (Sciurus ruber; Rafin.)
  262. Green Plover (Charadrius viridis; Rafin.)
  263. Red-Headed Swallow (Hirundo phenicephala; Rafin.)
  264. Tri-valve (Notrema fissurella; Rafin.) - Mollusk
  265. Audubon Snail (Espiphylla nympheola; Rafin.)
  266. Rafinesque Snail (Lomastoma terebrina; Rafin.)
  267. Woodman Snail (Eutrema terebroides; Rafin.)
  268. Gamusino [Gambusino, Gambozino]
  269. Tammaro
  270. Dahu
  271. Drungo
  272. Drop Bear
  273. Farm-Raised Goanna
  274. Swamp Auger (Bird) (Terebrapalus danielcoheni) 28
  275. Whiffle-Buck
  276. Swamp Gaboon
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Lumberwoods, Unnatural History Museum
Copyright © 2006- Thrill Land.

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